The Fremocentrist.com Art Inventory

Fremont Public Art Inventory, Part XI: New Arrivals (2013/14)

by Kirby Lindsay, posted 6 January 2015

 

In the lobby of the Stone34 building, this sculpture by Casey Curran decorates and demonstrates the effects of energy efficiency.  Photo by Adrian Laney, Sep '14

In the lobby of the Stone34 building, this sculpture by Casey Curran decorates and demonstrates the effects of energy efficiency. Photo by Adrian Laney, Sep ’14

The eleventh installment of the Fremocentrist.com inventory of Fremont’s public art is an attempt to catch us up with recent additions to the extensive, and ever growing, collection.  Although our count of Fremont’s public art pieces is incomplete count, installations continue to be added, including:

Interactive Stone34 Flowers

Installed: June 2014  Artist: Casey Curran  At Stone34, a Seattle Deep Green building constructed to higher standards of energy and water consumption than ever achieved before, this sculpture interacts with the power grid.  The 7-foot by 8-foot metallic depiction of plant life slowly shifts when energy use in the building is high, to make the flowers wilt, yet when energy use minimums are met, the flowers blossom.  The piece highlights efforts by the developer, Skanska, to create the most efficient commercial office building in the country.

Previously, one of the worst of the signal box eyesores.  Photo from N 40th St & Fremont Ave by K. Lindsay, Mar '14

Previously, one of the worst of the signal box eyesores. Photo from N 40th St & Fremont Ave by K. Lindsay, Mar ’14

Location:  Inside the lobby of the Stone34 Building, at 3400 Stone Way N

Signal Box Art – Six By Martz

Installed: Winter 2013/14  Artist:  Kyler Martz, in cooperation with Urban ArtWorks  These pieces started with Kathleen Warren, approaching representatives of the Fremont community about a program, developed by Urban ArtWorks, to decorate City of Seattle signal boxes.  Matt Gasparich, with the Fremont Neighborhood Council and donations he collected elsewhere, funded first to have three and then, finally, five boxes painted.  The B.F. Day School P.T.S.A. then funded painting of another box, an infamous target of often-foul graffiti, that stands by the entry stairs to the school playground.  Urban ArtWorks offered the commission to Martz, who has since designed the 2014 poster for the Fremont Fair, and had his original works displayed at Fremont First Friday Art Walk venues.

Artist Kyler Martz finishes details on his signal box art at N 35th St & Fremont Ave.  Photo by K. Lindsay, May 14

Artist Kyler Martz finishes details on his signal box art at N 35th St & Fremont Ave. Photo by K. Lindsay, May 14

Locations:  At NW corner of N 39th Street & Fremont Avenue N, at NW corner of N 36th Street & Fremont Avenue N, at SW corner of N 35th Street & Fremont Avenue N, at NE corner of N 36th Street & Phinney Avenue N, at W side of the Aurora Bridge, at N 46th Street southbound entrance ramp, and at B.F. Day Elementary School at 40th Street on Fremont Avenue

The Fremont Cat – ‘Nine Lives’

Installed: November 2013  Artist: Peter Reiquam  This 19-foot long, plate aluminum sculpture depicts the ‘Eveready Cat’ ready to spring into action at Fire Station #9.  The cat has long been the mascot of the Fremont fire station, although it is a trademarked and copyrighted two-dimensional cartoon image belonging to the Eveready Battery & Lighting Company.

Fire Station #9 mascot, on its truck.  Photo by K. Lindsay, Nov '13

Fire Station #9 mascot, on its truck. Photo by K. Lindsay, Nov ’13

Reiquam, after speaking with members of Station 9, determined how important the image has become to our 100+ year old station, and he decided to create the sculpture – once he acquired formal permission for the three-dimensional representation.  While he named the piece ‘Nine Lives’, he looks forward to this art being adopted by our community and becoming ‘The Fremont Cat.’

Location:  Leaping off the roof of Fire Station 9, at 3829 Linden Ave N

Saturn

Installed: September 2013  Artist: Brian Regan, and fabricated by B & B Aircraft  Inspired by a space theme, Regan took a year to design, have built and fully permit this large sculpture.  The piece sits at the edge of the roof of the building – also called Saturn – and its placement requires Regan to pay an annual fee, as the owner of the office building he also built.  The sculpture, which Regan doesn’t consider art, (“God designed it, I just copied it,” he is quoted as saying,) draws attention to his building, and he also installed solar panels on the ring that could create 2,800 – 3,000 watts of energy, enough to power lights in parts of the building.

The Fremont Cat, ever ready to help Fire Station #9.  Photo by K. Lindsay, Nov '13

The Fremont Cat, ever ready to help Fire Station #9. Photo by K. Lindsay, Nov ’13

Location: On the roof of the Saturn Building, at 3417 Evanston Ave N

‘Invasion Of The FoundFacians’

Installed: 2013  Artists: Jo Braun and Kate Jessup  This mixed-media mosaic mural incorporates the ‘found faces’ of pieces of hardware into a landscape of 9-feet by 10-feet.  Hired by the Saturn Building developer Brian Regan, the artists were given a niche in the north-facing wall in which to install their piece.  Using six Wedi (foam core cement) board panels, the piece was sized and sketched in place, created in Braun’s studio then transferred back to the site.  Regan hand-picked the artists he wanted to create a piece for this development, and let them choose to do the art they wanted.

A detail from the 'Invasion of the FoundFacians' by Jo Braun and Kate Jessup at the Saturn Building.  Photo by K. Lindsay, Sep '13

A detail from the ‘Invasion of the FoundFacians’ by Jo Braun and Kate Jessup at the Saturn Building. Photo by K. Lindsay, Sep ’13

Location:  On north wall of the Saturn Building, at 3417 Evanston Ave N

 

Fremont continues to build upon its collection of art, without any apparent effort to slow or curate the pieces added.  Yet, among the pieces added in a one-year period, the diversity of modality and themes might not have been achieved if attempted deliberately.  After all, of the five installations, four were selected by three different developers, with the fifth one influenced by three non-profit organizations.  Art in Fremont comes from sources both careful and capricious, and each installation adds to a collection that defies my abilities to categorize it.

I hope you enjoy at least some of it!

 

 

The Fremont Rocket and its new companion art piece, the Saturn.  Photo by K. Lindsay, Jan '14

The Fremont Rocket and its new companion art piece, the Saturn. Photo by K. Lindsay, Jan ’14


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©2015 Kirby Lindsay.  This column is protected by intellectual property laws, including U.S. copyright laws.  Reproduction, adaptation or distribution without permission is prohibited.

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